' Why do 40-50% of households must buy low quality water from private suppliers that charge 1.5-2.5 times official public utility prices?' 

Shaffaf Paani
Provide Clean Drinking Water
  
In Pakistan 78% of the population does not have access to clean drinking water and rural communities that make up 70% of Pakistan have limited access to water alone.  For instance, in the city of Karachi 40-50% of households must buy low quality water from private suppliers that charge 1.5-2.5 times official public utility prices.  Majority of the population can not afford bottled water prices so they must depend on the practice of tanker truck water suppliers that illegally siphon water from municipal lines and sell at higher prices.  These issues are especially apparent in peri-urban slums of Karachi, such as Ibrahim Hyderi, where the government is unable to keep up with demands of the growing population and it’s informal settlements in providing in-home piped service for each residence.  
 
The government of Pakistan under the Central Cabinet of Pakistan, approved the first national drinking water policy in September of 2009 that promises a minimum of 20 liters of safe drinking water per capita per day for rural household and 40 liters per capita per day for urban areas. In another document the government from Ministry of Environment promises that at least 45 and 120 liter per capita per day of drinking water should be available for rural and urban areas, respectively. 
 
We support Pakistan’s cause in distributing water to every one of its citizen.  However, the practice of tanker truck water suppliers illegally siphoning from municipal lines may deter the policies effectiveness.  At Ibrahim Hyderi in July 2010, locals protested about having no access to water for two weeks, caused by internal disputes between private water tankers and council members.
 
While water is available through the municipal system it still has trace contaminants. The quality of the water is further impaired by the practice of siphoning and storage into unhygienic tanks. Additionally, the policy in place to install water treatment plants for each village by 2015 falls drastically short of population projections and will furthermore under serve the current population.

PROJECT GOAL

Shaffaf Pani and Shaffaf Services will work the government’s national drinking water policy to distribute clean affordable water to all citizens of Pakistan. Our services will be the active local voice, and the supplemental drive for governmental policy to bring access to clean, reasonably priced water. From issues of rapid growth, inadequate municipal water systems, and act of illegal siphoning by private suppliers, Pakistan is facing difficulties not only with access to clean water, but also in providing reasonably priced water. Shaffaf Pani and Services will address these issues leveraging local support and governmental policies in place.

PROPOSAL

Shaffaf Pani and Services has a two stage implementation plan for addressing both quality and access to water supply. This plan is a preamble that will give Pakistan’s policy the foundation for the duration and scope it requires. The pilot program will focus in on a peri-urban slum of Karachi, Ibrahim Hyderi, with a population of 120,000.

As an informal settlement, majority of the residents of Ibrahim Hyderi do not have in-home piped service, therefore they must rely on tanker truck operations that siphon municipal water into unhygienic tanks and sell at 1.5-2.5 times official public utility prices.

Twenty percent of a Ibrahim Hyderi’s household monthly income is spent on low quality drinking water. The average income per person per month is $34 in Ibrahim Hyderi, with an average income per household of $100 per month, which is roughly $3.30 per day. The tanker truck’s prices average to $20 per month for an average household of 4 to 5.

By legalizing tanker operations, Pakistan can serve a larger population and reallocate plant installation funds to improving water networks, allowing the government to maintain the tanks cleanliness and provide justly priced water to all citizens. 

Shaffaf Pani First Stage             [start small]: 

Extending upon Pakistan’s National Drinking Water Policy, Shaffaf Pani will establish a business in Ibrahim Hyderi, that will first serve 1500 citizens in providing clean drinking water, with plans to scale after two years. It will sell purified water at lower prices than the high priced low-quality water they are currently buying.

Shaffaf Services Second Stage [think big]: 

In support of Pakistan’s National Drinking Water Policy, Shaffaf Services, will urge the government to legalize the tanker truck operations.

In Pakistan a neglect for maintenance, due to high cost, is a pattern that further disadvantages an already infrequent number of purification plants. Unlike the policy’s promise to install plants for each village, tanker operations will continue to serve the growing demands of informal settlements with no in-home piped service. Therefore, increasing the number of plants is not as important as expanding the coverage.

By legalizing tanker operations, Pakistan can serve a larger population and reallocate plant installation funds to improving water networks, allowing the government to maintain the tanks cleanliness and provide justly priced water to all citizens.

This plan will have to be implemented in incremental steps after establishing Shaffaf Pani business plan.

Shaffaf Services will earn profit by serving as a consulting firm for the tanker truckers, providing them legal advice for becoming a legal entity.

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